Benefits Of Diet Pill

Many people fail to lose weight because they don’t read out diet pills reviews and hence choose the wrong pills for themselves. For the best results, it is always advisable to go for some reviews online before selecting a particular product.

Nowadays, individuals are more conscious about their health and looks. They want to look smart and attractive among others. Diet pills are safe to use and highly effective. So far, unlimited folks were able to reduce excessive weight with help of these pills. Diet pills reviews online give readers useful information about the product, its benefit and list of the most reputable websites from where one can buy them.

Demand of online pills has magnificently increased in recent past years. These pills are one of the most excellent weight loss supplements and come with lots of variety and advantages when implemented into a diet program. These pills are highly helpful in boosting metabolism and suppressing hunger. Online pharmacies are same as local stores or local pharmacies. Online stores provide details about prescription diet pills and non prescription diet pills. Phentermine, the topmost weight-reducing drug has been frequently used by obesity patients. Phentermine pills have no side effect. These are one the most popular weight losses pills. Herbal pills are also beneficial. The main benefits of these pills are that they act as metabolism stimulants and appetite suppressants. The result is that you will eat less and burn more calories throughout the day. Weight loss can be simplified as “calories out” must be greater than “calories in”. By using the correct diet pills supplements, you can swing both sides of the equation in your favor.

These are the some advantages of these pills.

1.Fat burning pills are perfect way to loss the weight.

2.Improve general quality of your life.

3.Increase energy level can be utilized for intensive workout.

4.Boost your energy level.

5.Brought positive outcomes in lives of countless individuals.

In addition to this, diet pills raise your body temperature to burn more calories. Those who are victims of any disease, it is recommended to consult with a physician before taking any pill. Phentermine pills are the most commonly used. It is absolutely correct that limitless people living in different corners of world are taking these pills. Online stores provide these pills at affordable prices. Researching on internet is an ideal way to find a reliable online store. Prior to purchase any pill, it is necessary to evaluate overall experience and trustworthiness of online company or a store. Contact numbers and email ids are mentioned on website of these stores. Such companies and store offer global delivery services and believe in satisfaction of customers.

In addition to this, diet pills raise your body temperature to burn more calories. Those who are victims of any disease, it is recommended to consult with a physician before taking any pill. Phentermine pills are the most commonly used. It is absolutely correct that limitless people living in different corners of world are taking these pills. Online stores provide these pills at affordable prices. Researching on internet is an ideal way to find a reliable online store. Prior to purchase any pill, it is necessary to evaluate overall experience and trustworthiness of online company or a store. Contact numbers and email ids are mentioned on website of these stores. Such companies and store offer global delivery services and believe in satisfaction of customers.

Health care in Africa: What next?

NAIROBI, Kenya – In the war between humanity and disease, perhaps the greatest victory of recent years took place in Africa. At the turn of the millennium, serious analysts expected HIV/AIDS to kill up to half the people in some southern African countries. But then the price of anti-retroviral drugs fell from $10,000 a year to as little as $100, thanks to a loud campaign for access to treatment, some technical advances and a dollop of aid.
Slavea Chakova
Slavea Chakova
Suddenly, millions of HIV-positive Africans started taking pills that kept them alive. Also, by reducing the viral load in their bloodstream, the drugs made them less likely to infect other people, and thereby slowed the spread of the epidemic. AIDS is still deadly, but it is being brought under control. That’s something to celebrate.

Africa still has greater health problems than any other continent, but progress is visible on several fronts. Malaria is being beaten back. The World Health Organisation estimates that the deaths of nearly 4 million African children were prevented between 2000 and 2013 thanks to the use of insecticide and bednets. Several African countries, such as Swaziland, have plausible plans to eliminate the disease altogether. A vaccine already exists, though it is only partially effective. With luck, future vaccines will work better.

Progress

Africa still has greater health problems than any other continent, but progress is visible on several fronts

In several countries, recent years have seen the rise of low-cost private clinics, which provide essential services at a reasonable price. The spread of information technology has transformed health care. For example, at clinics in Kenya run by Access Afya, an NGO, staff upload patient data into an iPad app so it can be analysed centrally. Nurses also text patients to make sure they are taking their drugs.

Rwanda has shown that it is possible to provide national health insurance on a limited budget. Some 91% of Rwandans now have insurance—a higher proportion than in the United States. This is one reason why maternal mortality has fallen by three-quarters in Rwanda since 2000. Costs are kept down by using an army of community health workers to offer the first check-up before referring those who need more treatment to a doctor. If Rwanda can do it, so can others.

Huge problems remain. Fake drugs, for example, are far too common in Africa. In Nigeria, a study by the World Health Organisation in 2011 found that 64% of antimalarial drugs were fake. Such drugs are incredibly dangerous. Some are actually poisonous; the rest are harmless in themselves but make people think they are being properly treated when they are not. Governments and drug firms need to work harder to fight the fakes. Scanning systems that verify the origins of every box of pills are available and not too expensive.

Another challenge is the chronic shortage of trained health workers, especially in rural areas. Sub-Saharan Africa has a quarter of the world’s disease burden but only 3% of its medical workers. One problem is that many doctors and nurses emigrate to rich countries, but a bigger one is that not enough are trained in the first place. A partial solution is to train rural people as community health workers, the way Rwanda has. Another would be for rich countries to subsidise medical education in Africa.

Big challenges create big opportunities for smart investors. The demand for inexpensive health insurance in Africa is vast and barely tapped. As the mobile telephone revolution has shown, Africans will pay in advance for a service that works. Who will be the M-PESA of African health care?

Lifting the veil on drug pricing and trade agreements

A United Nations panel has called for pharmaceutical companies and governments to be more transparent about drug prices and closed door trade agreements it says are working to keep pills priced out of patients’ hands, according to a new report.
In November, United Nations secretary general, Ban Ki-moon, launched a high-level panel to investigate access to medicine globally. A large part of the work focused on how to balance the economic interests of governments and manufacturers keen to, for instance, retain patent protection on drugs with public health needs.

Lifting the veil on drug pricing and trade agreements
© ljupco 123rf.com

“Governments seek the economic benefits of increased trade. On the other hand, the imperative to respect patents on health technologies could, in certain instances, create obstacles to the public health objectives and the right to health,” Ruth Dreifuss, panel co-chair and former president of the Swiss Confederation, explained in a statement. Dreifuss chaired the group alongside former Botswana president, Festus Mogae.

In 10 months, the UN body gathered more than 6,000 contributions from governments, the private sector and civil society. It also held international consultations in Johannesburg and London.

In a report, the group called for far-reaching changes to increase transparency about not only how drug prices are set but also how countries such as the United States negotiated free trade agreements that often put patent protection in the spotlight.

What companies spend on research and development and how much this contributes to drug prices often remain closely guarded secrets. The report notes that the average cost of a 12-week course of the hepatitis C drug Sofosbuvir costs about $42,017, according to a survey of 26 countries. But the study also found wide variations in national prices for the drug, with US patients paying about 70% more for the drug than those in Japan.

The panel notes that without access to information about how drug prices are set, countries have varying success in negotiating affordable drug prices.

It argues that governments should require manufacturers to disclose not only how much of drug prices are driven by the need to recoup costs but also how public funding, including tax incentives, contribute to drug development.

Report comes as South African patent reform drags on

In 2011, South Africa was able to halve the price of HIV treatment after it required that companies tendering to supply HIV drugs submit detailed breakdowns of drug costs, listing the proportion of costs associated with production — from active ingredient purchases and drug formulation to shipping.

Following testimonies made in Johannesburg from patients, the panel has also recommended that patent laws be amended to prevent abuse, in particular instances in which older drugs are given new patents in a process called evergreening.

Babalwa Malgas told the panel that when she was diagnosed with an aggressive form of breast cancer, medical aid denied her treatment with the recommended drug, Herceptin because of its high costs.

Doctors Without Borders (MSF) has argued that South African patents on the drug expire at least 10 years later than they do in the United Kingdom or the US as a result of unmerited patent extensions in South Africa.

After more than four years reviewing its patent policy, South Africa’s department of trade and industry released what it is calling a consultative framework for public comment on Friday. Although the document is not a policy, it does say that adopting a more rigours patent examination is crucial. It also notes that making the process more transparent — and allowing third parties to contest patents before they are issued, as is done in India — would help the country ensure awarded patents were merited.

Further UN action urged

In April, MSF also raised the alarm over what it believed was calls by the European Union for India to tighten its patent regime during bilateral trade talks. With a long history of generic medicine production, India provides many of the affordable antiretrovirals that HIV-stricken countries in Africa depend on.

While the European Union and India remain in negotiations, the new UN report has slammed tactics and threats it says have been used in such trade talks to elicit patent protection gains that run contrary to international intellectual property laws that protect public health interests.

MSF has welcomed the report.

“(The report) puts forth actionable recommendations to help overcome the challenges that our medical teams have faced for decades – being left essentially empty-handed when the medicines, vaccines and diagnostics we need for our patients don’t exist, or are too expensive,” said Rohit Malpani, director of policy and analysis for the organisation’s Access Campaign.

“The report’s global scope recognises that today all countries face challenges in ensuring availability and affordable access to the medical tools that people need to live healthy and productive lives.”

The panel has called on Ban to establish an independent review body to monitor progress in access to medicines and the implementations of recommendations made in the report. It has also asked that a special UN session on the topic be held by 2018.

The Internet of Things and big data in the real world

Technology often progresses in ways that can surprise us. Just eight years ago, many people thought of the then-new Apple iPhone as an expensive toy of little interest to the workaday world or the average consumer. The idea that nearly everyone would own such a gadget sounded like crazy talk to some.
The Internet of Things and big data in the real world
©Wavebreak Media Ltd via 123RF
Today, the average Joe, Jane and their grandparents have a smartphone, and nearly everyone in the workforce depends on a mobile device to be productive. The Internet of Things is on the verge of a similar explosion into the mainstream, and it promises to transform business processes even more deeply than mobile devices have.

Yet many people still think of the Internet of Things – along with related trends such as autonomous self-driving cars, advanced robotics, and software intelligence – as the stuff of science-fiction.

So, here are three real-world examples of how the Internet of Things is already finding a foothold in enterprises.

1. Fleet Management

Vehicle telematics has been around for a while, with many companies that run large fleets using it to monitor driver behaviour and track the locations of their vehicles. Some insurance companies also use it to monitor driver behaviour (acceleration, braking, cornering, speeding, etc.) and reward insured drivers for driving safely.

The Internet of Things promises to take vehicle telematics to a whole new level by giving organisations the ability to collect richer data about vehicles and drivers, and acting on this information in real-time. Companies like UPS, one of the world’s largest shipping groups, are already tapping into this potential. UPS uses sensors on its delivery vehicles to monitor speed, fuel consumption, mileage, the number of stops, and engine health. The sensors in its vehicles capture more than 200 data points for each of its 80,000 vehicles. The information allows the company to reduce idling time, fuel consumption, and harmful emissions.

2. Healthcare

More and more people are using fitness trackers and smartphone apps to stay on top of their heart rates, the distance they’ve jogged and other health data. But expect many other radical applications of the Internet of Things to rapidly emerge in the health and lifestyle segment.

For example, an American company called Preventice has developed a platform that brings together mobile, tablet, cloud, and physiological monitoring technologies for remote patient monitoring. Its BodyGuardian Sensor and sophisticated algorithms allow doctors and nurses to monitor a patient’s health remotely so he or she doesn’t need to stay in the hospital longer than necessary.

Another US startup called Proteus is pioneering smart pills. Each pill contains a tiny sensor so medical professionals and health insurers can track whether a patient is adhering to her treatment regime as well as how it is affecting her body.

3. Agriculture

One of the most interesting examples of a traditional company using the Internet of Things to change its industry is the multinational farming equipment and supplies firm, John Deere. It has developed a system that uses field-installed probes to monitor soil moisture levels at various depths. The platform then sends the information to a web-based interface where farms can see the data and make timely irrigation decisions from anywhere.

Farmers can also use environmental sensors to measure air and soil temperature, wind speed, humidity, solar radiation, rainfall and leaf wetness. Thus, the combination of sensors and big data analytics empowers farmers to see where crops thrive so they can become more profitable.

Closing words

Though it seems overhyped right now, the Internet of Things will have a massive impact on industries as diverse as utilities, telecoms, manufacturing, healthcare and logistics in the years to come. It will enable enterprises to automate many tasks and roles that once needed human intervention. In the process, it will speed up business processes, reduce costs, and allow for timelier, better-informed decision-making.

We see the Internet of Things as a major opportunity for our clients because it allows them to connect nearly all of their business equipment, assets, and people together in an intelligent and responsive network. Suddenly, objects can communicate directly with each other, and react to the world around them.

To take advantage of massive data volumes, and intelligent, connected sensors and devices in the workplace, companies will need to invest in robust business management systems. Companies that have this back-office fundamental in place will be in an excellent position to take advantage of the benefits offered by the Internet of Things.